The Via Feminina: Revisioning the Heroine’s Journey by Mary Sharratt —

Reblog of this piece. How am I 52 years old and this is the first day I found out about The Heroine’s Journey? How? Excuse me whilst I disappear down a wormhole. I’m off to finish reading The Writer’s Journey by Vogler and then The Heroine’s Journey by Murdock. Here’s Murdock’s webpage and explanation of … Continue reading The Via Feminina: Revisioning the Heroine’s Journey by Mary Sharratt —

Why “Gentle Writing Advice,” Exactly? — Chuck Wendig: Terribleminds

If you follow me on Twitter (you fool), you may have seen that I have been doing a thread over there of so-called GENTLE WRITING ADVICE. (That thread is here.) And I just wanted to talk about, for a moment, why I’m doing that. So, an indeterminate amount of time ago — my Pandemic Brain…Why “Gentle … Continue reading Why “Gentle Writing Advice,” Exactly? — Chuck Wendig: Terribleminds

Review: The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher and other stories

By Hilary Mantel (2014) This is a patchy collection of stories. I only liked three of them. Lots of reviews don't like all of them, though amusingly they all differ in which ones they think are good. Here's the review that I agreed with most. James Lasdun in the Guardian. I read the collection to … Continue reading Review: The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher and other stories

Writing a Synopsis

I’m reblogging this extremely thorough explanation of what’s required for my MA synopsis – so I don’t lose it! 

Masters Degree Creative Writing: A Journal

For our next TMA, we
have to write a synopsis for the major work we’ll be submitting at
the end of the year. I’ve been looking into what a synopsis involves.
These websites have been very helpful:

Jericho Writers: How to Write a Novel Synopsis

Writers and Artists: Write a Great Synopsis

The Literary Consultancy: How to Write a Synopsis

Marissa Meyer: 6 Steps for Writing a Book Synopsis

First question, what is a synopsis? It’s a summary of the plot of
your novel, including the ending and any major plot twists. It should
show the hook or premise. When pitching to an agent or publisher, you
would typically send a synopsis of your work along with a covering
letter and perhaps the opening chapters of the novel. The style of
your synopsis can be quite dry, written in neutral language; Marissa
Meyer describes it as stripped of ‘intrigue, humour…

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George Saunders: Everyone Wants to Be Loved. What Do We Do with That? — Literary Hub

How To Proceed is a bi-monthly conversation about writing, creativity and the world we live in. Author Linn Ullmann talks to some of the world’s most exciting literary voices about their books, their writing process, and how they view the world and current events around them. In this episode, George Saunders talks about Trump, civility, […]George … Continue reading George Saunders: Everyone Wants to Be Loved. What Do We Do with That? — Literary Hub

More Content, Less Glue

I had no idea such a thing existed. Want. Really badly want. More than the robot hoover, and I really wanted that.

Sue Cook's Writing Blog

Tracey from The People’s Friend has asked me to submit the pocket novel I pitched in December. So I’m polishing the remaining thirteen chapters, tweaking characters, ironing out a crinkly plot and cutting 4000 words. This is a huge job that I’m streamlining with help from style editor ProWritingAid.

ProWritingAid’s many tools highlight weaker areas of writing. To target my tendency to waffle, I like ‘overused words’ and ‘sticky words’.

Part of Prowriting Aid’s toolbar.

‘Overused’ is pretty obvious. It highlights common words you rely on when scampering through your first draft: have, just, think, know, for example. I want to focus on stickiness.

It took ages to understand ‘sticky’, or glue, words. Sticky is ProWritingAid’s term for non-content words. This includes prepositions (in, on, over), articles (a, the) and some verbs. How can I leave these out? By being more creative, that’s how!

To understand non-content words…

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